Power Station Control Room Simulator delivered to SSE

ORIGINS OF THE TRAINING SIMULATOR REQUIREMENT

Thanks to a premium contract from National Grid, the skills of Peterhead’s control
room operators were critical to the station’s continued operation. Peterhead is one of the power generating resources commissioned by National Grid under its Strategic Balancing Reserve, designed to assure that at least 5% excess grid capacity is maintained constantly UK-wide. The significance of skills and training is that the National Grid contract calls for control sequences that even long-serving operators had never encountered previously. Such as switching individual generators in and out, on remote command, as National Grid seeks to balance demand with supply.
It was this imperative of having a well drilled squad of control room operators
that drove Peterhead to adopt a simulator based approach to mission-critical
operational training.

SIMULATION MODEL AND OPERATIONAL SCENARIOS

The need to replicate the Peterhead plant meant that the simulator project had a significant development element.
“The systems and processes that had to be modeled were elaborate”, observes Alex Wallace. “Starting up and shutting down a generator, for example, involves a 10 hour sequence in 56 steps. Devising the best way to transfer and convert data from our
PI plant data historian system into Pisys’s software was also pretty taxing. As was designing all the scenarios we could foresee needing for our course programmes (like switching down from three turbines to two). And so, anticipating challenges such as
these, we assigned one of our best engineers to support Pisys’s development activity”.

ENTER PISYS

With this background Pisys were contacted in 2011 on behalf of Peterhead’s Operations Manager. Ray Allen, Pisys’s Director responsible for the Peterhead relationship, Comments: “Because of the scale of the project, SSE had to goout to tender. There were two other companies in contention – one of them a household name. The brief was to take the existing plant and model it in just enough detail for training purposes”. SSE Project Engineer Alex Wallace picks up the thread: “Providing a meaningful Training experience hinged on being able to run realistic scenarios. And because of that, the plant had to be modelled to a high degree of integrity. It was evident that close working between the Peterhead team and the simulator developer would be critical to the success of the project. Pisys fitted the bill perfectly in this respect, and also submitted a proposal featuring an attractive combination of price and build time”.Ray adds: “I suspect that how we develop our simulator systems also played a part. Our basic architecture, which was already proven across many installations, separates the plant-specific aspect – the model of the asset – from the underlying simulation engine.  We build our models top-down. So they embody all the plant and process detail that’s required for control room training, but without all the nuts and bolts and the molecular level physics.
“The turbine and control system manufacturers take a very different, bottom-up approach for their so-called ‘fully blown’ simulators - emulating the detailed physics of the turbines and other key elements of the plant. That’s largely why we were able to deliver a high fidelity user experience with a much slimmer price tag"

A CLOSE WORKING RELATIONSHIP

Having selected Pisys partly on the conviction that close co-operation would be vital to the success of the project, the Peterhead team found its expectations exceeded when detailed design and implementation commenced.
“They more or less moved in with us”, observes Malcolm Clark, Peterhead’s Simulator Training Lead. “Two of the Pisys team sat in the room next door to me, building the simulation model, while a third worked literally alongside me, developing the
live logic plans. As working relationships go, that was as close as it gets!”.
“I’d say it was a masterclass in inter-company teamwork”, Ray Allen interjects. Every technical discipline has its own vocabulary and language, and we were fortunate in having Alex and Malcolm on hand. Verifying our translation of the plant documentation was something they had to do. But they went far beyond that. Most of all, they went out of their way to make sure that our model represented accurately the systems and interfaces that trainees would have to become expert in”

STAFF TRAINING

Simulation training at Peterhead largely falls under two headings:

  •  Basic training for new starts – such as introductory courses for new engineers;
  •  More advanced training for control room operators.

Simulator training is fundamentally rooted on a framework of scenarios. In other words, the simulator presents the trainee with an “animated” sequence of events mimicking an operational sequence of the plant. Based upon this, the trainee plays out the role of control room operator as events unfold, responding to and managing the situation according to SSE’s time-honed operational procedures. The key to the success of simulator training is very simple: the trainee essentially learns the job by practicing in a “safe” environment. (No danger of blowing up the power station or bringing down the National Grid!). Malcolm Clark comments: “In a typical course we use a blend of real situations – where we re-run data extracted from our PI Plant Data Historian system – and potential scenarios that haven’t yet happened. So it’s a mixture of re-enacting past events and rehearsing possible futures”. He adds: “We don’t train droves of staff – it’s at the level of one or two people a month. But the numbers that matter here are not trainee numbers. It’s the potential cost of control room staff not being able to deal with  unforeseen events – and deal with them quickly – that makes the Pisys simulator crucial to the Peterhead operation”.

VALUE FOR MONEY

Talking of re-running scenarios: if they revisited the process of procuring their simulation training capability, would Alex and Malcolm do it exactly as in 2011? Or would they seek a different outcome? Malcolm replies first: “The Pisys simulator has paid for itself ten-fold already, and so we’ve had our value from it. Now a cold start takes seven hours (repeatably) – virtually a 50% reduction on the 13 hours it took before. So for each cold start, that’s a gain of six hours generating at hundreds of Megawatts”.
Alex adds: “Overall we got what we wanted, and it was a win-win in the end. Pisys’s capabilities are excellent, and their team were all very accommodating. There was also a lot of additional work required, and that was all done by Pisys within the original budget”

AN UNEXPECTED APPLICATION

Even before the Peterhead simulator had been fully developed, it was attracting interest from an unexpected quarter – plant engineering. Ray Allen explains: “Engineers started coming to us with queries about operational anomalies they had observed – along the lines of: ‘Step 42 in startup scenario B is taking much longer than we would expect’. To resolve these queries, we started running ‘What if?’ scenarios on the simulator – akin to using it like an optimisation tool”.
Malcolm Clark quickly emphasizes: “That’s true, but of course it’s not actually a plant optimisation system. Better to call it an alternative option for troubleshooting. If a plant engineer or a unit operator can sit down at the simulator and run through the relevant scenario, it gives them a quite different viewpoint. The simulation model represents the plant control processes with a high degree of fidelity. And because of that it can help the engineers to understand whether or not there is a flaw in the design of a particular process – and if so, then what the nature of the flaw is”.

A GOLD STAR SYSTEM SUPPLIER

Supposing Alex Wallace and Malcolm Clark were approached by another power station considering a Pisys simulator. What would be their advice? “I would say that it is really important to know what you want to build before you build it”, replies Alex.
I would explain the difference between a mathematical process simulation and a realistic, scenario based learning tool like ours, that uses historic plant data. And naturally I would give Pisys a gold star!”.

Hot Work Permit template

Hot work is one of the critical activities where permits are used. We’ve created a downloadable pdf with an example of a template which we use in our Permit to work system – please feel free to download and use as required and please get in touch if you’d like to find out more about how the Pisys Permit to work system can help streamline the control of work in your organisation.

 

Click to download the Hot Work permit pdf

Hot Work Permit to Work

What is a Hot Work Permit to work?

A Hot work permit to work , typically coloured red or red-edged, is generally applied to any type of work which involves actual or potential sources of ignition and which is done in an area where there may be a risk of fire or explosion, or which involves the emission of toxic fumes from the application of heat. They are normally used for any welding or flame cutting and for the use of any tools which may produce sparks. Hazardous activities like hot work must be managed safely and a core element of this is an effective management system.

What is a typical set of questions for a Permit?

A typical Hot Work Permit will include but not be limited to the following:

  1. Are personnel trained in the use of fire extinguishers?
  2. Have flammable liquids/ materials been removed from the area?
  3. Have gas cylinders been properly secured and inspected?
  4. Have relevant drains, sewers, vents been protected from sources of ignition?
  5. Has an atmosphere test for flammables proved to be satisfactory?
  6. Is continuous Gas monitoring required ?
  7. Confirm that the PGD has been calibrated?
  8. Does the task require a standby person to keep a fire watch?
  9. Does the task require a member of management to be in attendance ?
  10. Are you aware a mandatory 1 hr fire watch is required after the work is completed?
  11. Check the equipment before use.
  12. Are at least two fire extinguishers available?
  13. Have for fire blankets/ shielding being provided and in place ?
  14. Is there an operational water hose available?

Pisys Permit to work software helps you setup your Hot Work questions and keep track of your required contractor competencies using the Contractor Management Module. The system is fully user-configurable to match your specific needs, so field names and layouts can be added or modified as required.

 

Hot Work Permit with required contractor competencies.

Action Tracking in Wood PLC – ‘Pisys was our first choice’

Background

Wood is the largest provider of brownfield services to the
oil and gas industry, specialising in process, safety and environment; instrument and controls, electrical, structural, civil, and mechanical and piping. The company had a well-defined process for HAZOPs already but came across action tracking Issues when they took on a new oilfield development project for a large operator.

When companies decide to adopt it, action tracking is invariably a “need to do”, rather than a “nice to have”. Especially when safety and legislative drivers are in play.

In Wood’s case, the imperative was HAZOP tracking.
Mike Forrest, Wood’s UK Head of Process and Safety Engineering, explains: “With HAZOP and HAZID actions, you need to close the loop, you need the actions to be visible to multiple people, and you need to see where you are with all the actions. Reducing risk is what underpins it, because where there are high hazard risks – as with Piper Alpha – you could lose the whole platform”.

Pete Henderson, the Pisys Director responsible for the Wood relationship, comments: “Wood already had a well-defined process for HAZOP tracking. But there were all sorts of local systems around the Group. In many situations, people were attempting to track actions using a spreadsheet or even individual emails. As there was no means for central reporting, no-one could see everything to do with actions in one place. And inevitably there was a general lack of accountability”.

 

Action Tracking Challenges

HAZOP action tracking was done via spreadsheet or even
individual emails. There was:

  • No means for central reporting
  • No central place to save actions and view their
    status
  • A lack of accountability.

The company needed a system where:

  • Actions were closed out consistently and in a
    timely manner
  • Actions were visible to all personnel involved
  • The status of an action was clearly visible.

Why Pisys?

Solution

Wood adopted Pisys Action Tracking for HAZOPs.

Pisys customized the system to provide:

  • Added capability for handling multi-level approvals
  • Consolidated reporting across multiple contracts
  • A strategic response function, giving project engineers early insight into potential design changes so they could consider the implications in terms of cost and schedule

The action tracker was rolled out first in the UK, then
worldwide

“The trigger point for Wood was when we took over an oilfield development project for a large operator. We quickly found HAZOP tracking issues, and I knew straight away that we needed a system. The company’s ongoing ability to operate its fleet depends critically on the company’s tracking and recording of incidents and accidents” said Mike.

Mike acted quickly: “Two weeks later, we installed Pisys
ATMS Action Tracking System. I’d seen it in action with another Oil & Gas Major a few years previously. I’d been sufficiently impressed that we just went straight to Pisys when we realised that things were in a muddle”.

Configuration and Global Rollout

According to Mike Forrest, the action tracker’s subsequent success was not a foregone conclusion: “We invited commercial tenders a couple of months later, and evaluated one other system as well as ATMS. The other system was highly flexible, but ultimately our preference was for a more straightforward
system. And we knew Pisys ATMS would do the job.

Added to that, Pisys were able to demonstrate how to set
up a HAZOP very easily”.

  • The project, conceived from the outset as a global rollout,
    commenced in late 2013 with a 2-month configuration phase in which Pisys made modifications to meet Wood’s requirements –notably:
  • Adding capability for handling supplementary approvals,
    sign-offs and signatures;
  • Enabling ATMS to provide consolidated reporting across
    multiple contracts;
  • Incorporating a strategic response function, which gives project engineers early insight into potential design changes, to understand the implications in terms of cost and schedule.

Over the course of 2014, ATMS was rolled out across the UK, and then around the world.

Pete Henderson comments:  “The first ATMS installation for
Wood was for BP’s Andrew Area Development Project, which at that time was the largest project in Aberdeen.

Now we have 700 users across 30 different Wood projects. In the UK alone, ATMS is now used in Wood’s contracts with BP, CNR, Enquest, Total, Taqa, Talisman and BG  It is also deployed where Wood is acting as dutyholder – notably for Centrica, Ithaca and Dana”.

Mike Forrest interjects: “The system has been taken up in both Australia and Kazakhstan, and there are several thousand more users who could potentially come onto the system in other regions of the world.

The system has been hosted by Pisys all through the rollout, and it’ll remain that way because that’s what’s most convenient for Wood”.

Action Tracking - Fit for Purpose

Mike’s confidence in ATMS is evident from the fact that he went straight to Pisys as soon as he had a critical need on his hands. But is there real evidence that ATMS fits the bill?

Mike believes so: “Well, I can tell you that the Pisys system is pretty good for what we want it for.

I can also tell you that it’s robust, it’s efficient, and it makes the whole business of tracking actions more visible than it could ever be in spreadsheets.

On top of that, I get the sense that it is very well structured. And from many years of procuring and using software, I know that strong structure in software means it’s likely to be easier to maintain as well as more robust”.

He continues: “But my opinion counts for nothing unless the system actually does its job. Which it does. We don’t have to force our engineers to use ATMS, because it is obviously beneficial to them. People can see a response to an action, and they can see that actions are being worked on.

In addition, managers can see both the numbers of outstanding actions and also the overdue actions. That gives them assurance oversight”

A system that fits the way we work

How would Mike advise a colleague in another company who is considering a system for action tracking?

“I’d suggest that they think twice before going for a big system with limitless flexibility. Because flexibility usually means complexity. And no-one wants to struggle with IT complexities instead of getting on with the job!

Other systems dictate that users do things that just aren’t convenient – like having to prepare and submit responses all in one batch. But ATMS is the other way round. Our users love it, because it fits the way they work”.

Support Performance from Pisys

Another common wisdom in the world of IT is that any software system is only as reliable as the underlying support.

Is Mike’s confidence in ATMS matched by his belief in its backup team?

“Pisys are very responsive. Their support is inclusive in the fee, and the way they react is spot on. Especially in comparison to some other companies, they are very good indeed”.

Mike is keen to emphasise the reliability of Pisys support, irrespective of the origin of  the problem: “Daily use of a system like this means that mistakes will happen – like putting actions in the wrong way. Because of ATMS’s audit trail and lock-down functionality, certain types of error can’t be undone by users. That’s quite deliberate, and it even applies to Wood’s ultimate system administrator – me. But that’s never a problem, because Pisys will always apply a fix within a day–even for bulk errors”.

Beyond the Global Rollout

Asked how they see the relationship between Wood and Pisys developing in the future, both Mike and Pete refer to the ongoing global rollout – Pete in terms of additional users, and Mike in terms of further countries.

Pete also refers to other systems that Wood have asked Pisys to develop, such as a strategic maintenance management tool.

Mike picks up the theme: “People have seen how Pisys go about their work, and they’ve been impressed enough to ask what else they can do. And we now have other areas of Wood looking at ATMS for completely different operations whose existing action tracking systems are just not as good as ATMS. Such as commercial and business functions.

“Take, for example, ATMS’s automatic emailing of approvals and reminders to the relevant individuals. Anyone who’s used that facility will tell you it’s indispensable – it’s
one of the main things that ensures that things get done. But it’s just not there in other systems. That’s why we’re now looking at extending the Pisys system to grade and monitor business risks: moving towards tracking everything under one umbrella.”

It Takes Two

One thing that’s very clear from the way Mike Forrest
talks is that successful software deployment isn’t just about software.

The quality of the service provider – and of the relationship between the client and supplier teams –is also key:

“One of ATMS’s strengths is how easily our users can configure and manage it. Its set-up is directly influenced by Wood engineers, and we’ve been able to work with Pisys to get the changes that the engineers asked for. That’s how we reached the happy position where they’ve got the system they want”.

Pete Henderson is quick to highlight Wood’s contribution to the relationship’s success: “Yes – we work well together. But the best service provider in the world will struggle to sustain a good client/supplier relationship if the customer’s behaviour doesn’t favour a successful project. We have regular communication with the Wood team, and we find them proactive and involved. To give an example, they email Pisys regularly on aspects of the usability of the system. They’re always constructive, and it’s invariably in the spirit of working together towards common goals”.

The Pisys Action Tracker

Pisys ATMS is designed to track actions relating to a given project or organisation. It essentially enables actions to be recorded, managed and reported upon, and it is particularly strong in situations where:

  • Multiple people are involved in review and
    sign-off of actions
  • Close-out of actions is critical
  • Having an audit trail is mandatory (e.g. for
    projects involving HAZOP, technical assurance or project delivery assurance)

Companies gaining particular benefit from this type of system include those employing large teams of people, or deploying teams on large projects. With a global base of around 3,600 users, ATMS is especially strong in:

  • Situations involving multiple organisations and locations
  • Complex projects generating large numbers of
    actions requiring active management.

ATMS provides a very quick overview of action status regardless of the size or complexity of the project.

Microsoft Authenticator App

Install & Configure the Microsoft Authenticator App

Step 1

On your mobile device:

  • Go to your device’s App Store (iPhone users–you may be prompted for your Apple ID and password).
  • Search for Microsoft Authenticator App.

Step 2:

Install the app on your phone.

Open the app. The following series of popup windows will appear:

  • In Microsoft Respects your Privacy…, select OK.
  • On the “Set up passwordless sign-in for your personal Microsoft account screen”, choose Skip.
  • On the next screen “Ready to add your first account?” select Add account.

  • On the screen “What kind of account are you adding?”, select Other.
  • You will see a pop-up window on your screen that says Authenticator would like to access the camera, select OK. Your camera will open.

  • Leave the camera open and immediately return to your computer screen.

Note: if you missed any of the above steps, you could select the back arrow at the top left of the screen, select Add an account or the + symbol on the screen, then choose Other as the account, and continue.

Step 3:

Important! For this step, you will use your mobile device and your computer at the same time. Have your mobile device in your hand.

  • On your computer navigate to your ATMS instance.
  • At the log in screen, log in as normal.
  • The next screen will ask you to set up the Two Factor Authentication (2FA).

You now have 2 options:

Using your mobile device, Scan a QR code.

  • The Scan the QR code window will open on your computer.

  • The camera is already open on your mobile device.
  • Now raise your mobile device up in front of the computer screen.
  • The camera will automatically scan (take a picture) of the QR code that appears on your computer screen. This happens very quickly.
  • Once the QR code has been scanned the Authenticator app will list ATMS as one of the registered accounts.

Using your mobile device, Manually Enter Code.

  • On your mobile device, select Enter Code Manually.
  • Type the account name as it appears on your computer screen in the “Account Name” field of the authenticator app.
  • Enter the secret key as it appears on your computer screen in the “Secret Key” field of the authenticator app.
  • Click Finish.
  • Once the secret key code has been accepted the Authenticator App will list your Account Name as one of the registered accounts for ATMS.

Step 4:

  • Close the Authenticator app on your mobile device.
  • You have successfully set up your mobile device and your computer for accessing ATMS using two factor authentication.

Going forward, the only time you will need to open the Authenticator app is when you login to ATMS from any computer or mobile device.

  • At the Login screen you will still login as normal, using a username and password.
  • Once you successfully login you will be prompted to provide an Authenticator code.

  • Go to your mobile device and locate the Microsoft Authenticator App.
  • Open it and click on ATMS.
  • Enter the code shown on your ATMS login screen at your computer.
  • Alternatively, you can request a security code to be send out via email in case you do not have your phone at hand.

Google Authenticator App

Install & Configure the Google Authenticator App

Step 1

On your mobile device:

  • Go to your device’s App Store (iPhone users–you may be prompted for your Apple ID and password).
  • Search for Google Authenticator.

Step 2:

  • Install the app on your phone. Depending on your settings, you may have to verify your PIN or approve the download. When the download is complete, the “Install” button will change to “Open,” and Authenticator’s vault icon will be added to your app list.
  • Open Authenticator. If you are still in the Play Store, tap Open. Otherwise, tap the new vault icon in your app list.
  • Tap Get Started. This takes you to the “Setup your first account”

Step 3:

Important! For this step, you will use your mobile device and your computer at the same time. Have your mobile device in your hand.

  • On your computer navigate to your ATMS instance.
  • At the log in screen, log in as normal.
  • The next screen will ask you to set up the Two Factor Authentication (2FA).

You now have 2 options:

Using your mobile device, Scan a QR code.

  • The Scan the QR code window will open on your computer.

  • On your mobile device select Scan a QR code.
  • The camera is open on your mobile device.
  • Now raise your mobile device up in front of the computer screen.
  • The camera will automatically scan (take a picture) of the QR code that appears on your computer screen. This happens very quickly.
  • Once the QR code has been scanned the Google Authenticator app will list ATMS as one of the registered accounts.

Using your mobile device, Manually Enter Code.

  • On your mobile device, select Enter a setup key.
  • Type the account name as it appears on your computer screen in the “Account Name” field of the Google authenticator app.
  • Enter the secret key as it appears on your computer screen in the “Your Key” field of the Google authenticator app.
  • Set the Type of Key as “Time Based”.
  • Click
  • Once the secret key code has been accepted the Google Authenticator App will list your Account Name as one of the registered accounts for ATMS.

Step 4:

  • Close the Google Authenticator app on your mobile device.
  • You have successfully set up your mobile device and your computer for accessing ATMS using two factor authentication.

Going forward, the only time you will need to open the Authenticator app is when you login to ATMS from any computer or mobile device.

  • At the Login screen you will still login as normal, using a username and password.
  • Once you successfully login you will be prompted to provide an Authenticator code.

  • Go to your mobile device and locate the Google Authenticator App.
  • Open it and click on ATMS.
  • Enter the code shown on your ATMS login screen at your computer.
  • Alternatively, you can request a security code to be send out via email in case you do not have your phone at hand.

ESET Secure Authentication App

Install & Configure the ESET Secure Authentication (ESA) Mobile App

Step 1

On your mobile device:

  • Go to your device’s App Store (iPhone users–you may be prompted for your Apple ID and password).
  • Search for ESET Secure Authentication.

Step 2:

  • Install the ESET Secure Authentication mobile app on your phone.
  • Locate the ESET Secure Authentication icon and tap to open it.
  • Review the license agreement and tap I accept.

  • We recommend that you set a PIN to protect ESET Secure Authentication from unauthorized access. To set your PIN, tap Yes.
  • Type your PIN into the New PIN and Confirm PIN fields and tap OK.

  • After setup, if you need to change your PIN, tap the application menu, and select Change PIN. Once your PIN is configured, ESET Secure Authentication is ready to use.

Step 3:

Important! For this step, you will use your mobile device and your computer at the same time. Have your mobile device in your hand.

  • On your computer navigate to your ATMS instance.
  • At the log in screen, log in as normal.
  • The next screen will ask you to set up the Two Factor Authentication (2FA).

Using your mobile device, Scan a QR code.

  • The Scan the QR code window will open on your computer.

  • On your mobile device, tap the ESET Secure Authentication icon on the home screen to open the ESET Secure Authentication mobile application.
  • Click on the blue plus (+) icon to add a new account.
  • A pop up may ask you to allow access to the camera.
  • Click Allow.
  • The camera is open on your mobile device.
  • Scan the QR code.
  • Now raise your mobile device up in front of the computer screen.
  • The camera will automatically scan (take a picture) of the QR code that appears on your computer screen. This happens very quickly.
  • Once the QR code has been scanned the ESET Secure Authentication mobile app will list ATMS as one of the registered accounts.

Step 4:

  • Close the ESET Secure Authentication mobile app on your mobile device.
  • You have successfully set up your mobile device and your computer for accessing ATMS using two factor authentication.

Going forward, the only time you will need to open the ESET Secure Authentication app is when you login to ATMS from any computer or mobile device.

  • At the Login screen you will still login as normal, using a username and password.
  • Once you successfully login you will be prompted to provide an Authenticator code.

  • Go to your mobile device and locate the SET Secure Authentication mobile app.
  • Open it and click on ATMS.
  • Enter the code shown on your ATMS login screen at your computer.
  • Alternatively, you can request a security code to be send out via email in case you do not have your phone at hand.

Offline Data Tab

The "Project Export" feature allows download projects as .zip files. All action data and attachments for the projects and any sub-projects will be stored in a windows readable format for reference offline or after project close out.

Action Tracking - offline data tab

To export a project you have to select it from the Project drop down. Only one project at a time can be exported.

If a project has child projects then they will need to be selected separately for export.

Once a project has been selected the screen will be updated to reflect the changes. The number of any project attachments or action attachments will be shown together with the number of available actions in the project.

offline data project selected - Action tracking system

Click on the Write Offline Data button to start the export of your data.

A .zip folder will be generated by the system and it will have the name of the Project that was exported.

The zip folder will in turn include a separate folder for each Action and inside each of the Action folders you will have the pdf of the action and any attachments the action had.

Actin Tracker offline data folder structure

Translations

Translations Tab

We have seen in many occasions in this manual that ATMS™ is completely configurable - we know that different businesses need to track different things and some times in different languages as well.

Sometimes businesses may not even call the items they are tracking "actions". All of the ATMS™ labels can be found under the Translations Tab.

Administration Screen - Translations

To explain simply Translations is where ATMS™ labels are build. So for example, we know that we have a tab called Users where an administrator will create users and add them to teams and give them permissions. Perhaps this tab can now be labeled as: Users Administration.

All a user has to do is go to Translations find the Users entry and change it to be called Users Administration.

Another good use of Translations is for situations where a client wants to use ATMS™ in a different language. The Translations Tab is where they can come and change all labels to match their requirements.

Status Tab

The Status of each stage of an action is automatically set when a Control Group is created and controls are set. The basic principle behind ATMS™ is that an individual creates an action and assigns it to someone who does some work with it before indicating that it is complete.

The word "Complete" above is a Status. ATMS™ will automatically create a set of stauses for every quaifying control type that gets added. Statuses are normally created for Reviewer control types and action stages (creation, completion, etc.)

Some Statuses can be edited (title ONLY) and others are fixed and cannot be edited at all. The Statuses can be edited on the Status Tab.

Administration Screen - Status

Edit Status

The Control Group dropdown at the top of the Status Tab page allows the user to select the control group that applies to their project in order to see the statuses available. Each control group will most likely have different statuses depending on what control types have been added to it.

To edit a status simply select it from the list of available statuses and either click on the Edit button or double click to open the edit status screen. As seen below each status will have a Title (Status Text) and a Description.

The Description is not editable but the Title can be edited on statuses that were created by the addition of an action state control type (Completed, Open, Canceled, etc.). Statuses that were created by the addition of reviewer control types cannot be edited at all.